ASOR/EPHE European Symposium

Paris, La Sorbonne, September 4-5, 2018

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Calls for submissions

open to ASOR and EPHE members, as well as to other scholars members of European institutions

Interaction between Violence, Order, and Conflict within the Political Sphere of Ancient Worlds

Session

What are the justifications for human violence used by rulers in ancient Near East and neighboring regions? How was violence used and in what forms? In their book “Order, Conflict and Violence,” Stathis N. Kalyvas, Ian Shapiro and Masoud Tarek (2008) highlight the lack of integration between order, conflict and violence in the study of human behavior. What are the dynamics of order for our periods according to context? What proportion of violence was for the order? What is the part of objectivity in investigating violence? And to what extent can narrative literature and images help us to understand violence in Ancient Worlds? By questioning the interaction between violence, order, and conflict within the scope of politics, the aim of this symposium is to reassess our understanding of violence in the Ancient World from the Neolithic to the Late Antiquity periods. We would very much appreciate multidisciplinary collaborations between the philologist, philosopher, sociologist, political historian, military historian, anthropologist, and archaeologist from contemporary and ancient times.

Submission

Collaborative Projects among European and International Scholars for the Study of Ancient Worlds Using Digital Approaches

Session

Since the Digital Era, computational methods and practices have produced new evidence for our understanding of Ancient Near Eastern and neighboring civilizations from Neolithic to Late Antiquity. However, unfortunately, international collaborations are still limited. Just as CenterNet helps to build a network of digital humanities, our aim is to collectively initiate discussion for building collaborative opportunities among European and international scholars. No matter how advanced your Ancient World digital project is, we invite you to introduce your methods, in order to either find a partner, or build a network of digital humanities within our fields of research. We strongly encourage European junior scholars to present their digital practices, especially when it encourages collaboration between scholars from different fields (e.g. archaeologist/art historian).

Submission